Our size guide is separated by brand and sport to help you find the right fit for you.

Disclaimer: all sizes on the website are shown in UK sizes.

Select a Size Guide

Mens Clothing

International Chest (in) Waist (in)
XS 34 28-30
S 36 30-32
M 38-40 32-34
L 42-44 34-36
XL 46-48 36-38
2XL 50-52 38-40
3XL 54-56 40-42
4XL 58-60 42-44

Ladies Clothing

UK International Bust/Chest (in) Waist (in) Hips (in)
6 2XS 30 22 32
8 XS 32 24 34
10 S 34 25 35
12 M 36 27 37
14 L 38 29 39
16 XL 40 31 40
18 2XL 42 33 43
20 3XL 44 35 45
22 4XL 46 37 47

Junior and Infant Clothing

UK Boys Age UK Girls Age
XXSB 5-6 yrs XXSG 5-6 yrs
XSB 6-7 yrs XSG 6-7 yrs
SB 7-8 yrs SG 7-8 yrs
MB 9-10 yrs MG 9-10 yrs
LB 11-12 yrs LG 11-12 yrs
XLB 13 yrs XLG 13 yrs

Mens Footwear

UK Size USA Size General Continental
5.5 6 38 2/3
6 6.5 39 1/3
6.5 7 40
7 7.5 40 2/3
7.5 8 41 1/3
8 8.5 42
8.5 9 42 2/3
9 9.5 43 1/3
9.5 10 44
10 10.5 44 2/3
10.5 11 45 1/3
11 12 46
11.5 12.5 46 2/3
12 13 47 1/3
12.5 13.5 48
13 14 48 1/3
13.5 14.5 49 1/3
14 15 50
15 16 -

Ladies Footwear

UK Size USA Size General Continental
2.5 5 35
3 5.5 35 1/2
3.5 6 36
4 6.5 36 2/3
4.5 7 37 1/3
5 7.5 38
5.5 8 38 2/3
6 8.5 39 1/3
6.5 9 40
7 9.5 40 2/3
7.5 10 41 1/3
8 10.5 42
8.5 11 42 2/3
9 11.5 43 1/3
9.5 12 44

Child / Junior Footwear

UK USA General Continental
C10 C11 28
C10.5 C11.5 28.5
C11 C12 29
C11.5 C12.5 30
C12 C13 31
C12.5 C13.5 31
C13 1 32
C14 1.5 33
1 2 33
1.5 2.5 34
2 3 34
2.5 3.5 35
3 4 36
3.5 4.5 36
4 5 37
4.5 5.5 37
5 6 38
5.5 6.5 38
6 7 39
6.5 7.5 39

Infant / Crib Footwear

UK USA General Continental
C0 C0.5 16
C0.5 C1 16.5
C1 C1.5 17
C1.5 C2.5 17.5
C2 C3 18
C2.5 C3.5 18.5
C3 C4 19
C3.5 C4.5 20
C4 C5 20.5
C4.5 C5.5 21
C5 C6 21.5
C5.5 C6.5 22
C6 C7 23
C6.5 C7.5 23.5
C7 C8 24
C7.5 C8.5 25
C8 C9 25.5
C8.5 C9.5 26
C9 C10 26.5
C9.5 C10.5 27

Tennis Racket Buying Guide

Buying a tennis racket can be a daunting process as there is so much choice in the modern game. Rackets are designed for a huge variety of players and it can be hard to know where to start. Here we have simplified the options into six easy steps so you can choose your new racket with confidence.

However if you do need some more help then please contact our experienced team on 0844 8476222 and they will be happy to offer you some advice. We also offer a demo service in our stores on most of the frames we stock, so if you are near one of our stores you may want to try a few out before making a purchase.

  1. Grip size

    This is one of the most important aspects of your new racket to get right. If you select a grip which is too small then you can end up putting too much strain on the arm and possibly leading to injury in the long run. Grips come in five sizes (G1 – G5), these measure from 4⅛” in circumference to 4⅝” increasing at ⅛” increments. To measure your grip size you can use one of two methods:

    • Measure from the tip of your middle finger to the middle crease on your palm. You then select the grip size which is closest to this measurement. For example if you measure 4¼” then you should select a G2.
    • Hold a racket in one hand and slide the index finger of the opposite hand between the tips of your fingers and the base of your hand. Your finger should fit comfortably into this gap without too much space. If it is very tight the grip is too small, if there is lots of space then the grip is too large.
  2. Hand size

    The head size of racket you choose will depend upon your playing style.

    • Oversize – These are the largest with a surface area of around 105 and 130sq”. These are the most forgiving with a larger sweet spot and offer the most power, and are best for those with a shorter swing. This tends to be beginners or those who just want a little more oomph!
    • Mid/Mid Plus – these usually measure between 90 and 105sq” and you will find that you get more control with a smaller head, but subsequently less power. As such these are used by players with a longer swing who are able to produce the power themselves and are instead looking for something more manoeuvrable with improved touch (control).
  3. Weight

    The weight of the racket is very important and this can have a huge impact on your game.

    • The lighter the racket the more power you will get from it as you can swing it through the air quicker. Lighter rackets (225g - 260g) are generally suited to people with a shorter swing who require a little more assistance from their racket.
    • Heavier rackets (280 – 340g) offer much more control and will also offer power through the greater mass, given that the player can provide the powerful swing. As such they are suited to those with a longer swing who are able to produce the power they need themselves.
    • Mid weight rackets (260g – 280g) will offer a good balance between power and control and tend to be a good option for juniors moving onto their first full size racket and for many recreational players.
  4. Balance

    • Head Heavy – this tends to be found in lighter weight rackets as the overall weight is kept low but more weight is found at the point of impact. This helps to offer more power as the racket can be swing faster while still maintaining weight in the hoop.
    • Head light – these tend to be preferred by more experienced players. More weight is located in the handle making the racket more manoeuvrable and easier to handle at the net. These offer more control to players who can produce their own power.
  5. Length

    The length of rackets only differs very slightly in modern rackets. Most rackets are 27” in length but you do also see 27.25” and 27.5” rackets. The longer length offers more reach and can also offer more leverage on the swing therefore helping to generate more power.

  6. Beam Width

    This refers to the width of the frame when held in profile. A wider beam will generate more power on the ball by enhancing the trampoline effect of the strings but this will also reduce the amount of control over the ball. In comparison a narrower beam will offer improved control.

Junior Rackets

Junior rackets range in length from 17” – 26”. In general a child should use the longest racket they can while still leaving plenty of space for them to swing the racket. Usually we would advise that a child should have about 1” clearance between the head of the racket and floor when they are holding the racket down by their side. Alternatively, below is a rough guide to help you chose the correct size for your child:

Length Recommended Age
19" Up to 4 years
21" 4 - 6 years
23" 7 - 8 years
25" 9 - 10 years
26" 10 - 12 years
Adult 12+ years

Adult Rackets

Adult Rackets are sized by the thickness of the grip rather than the length of the racket.

Measuring Up for Tennis Racket Grip Size: With your playing hand, open your palm and extend your fingers keeping them together as shown in diagram 1.1 below. Then take a ruler and align the edge with your third (ring) finger (A in Image) and the bottom of the ruler in line with the joint where your thumb meets your hand, so that 0" on the ruler is in line with the dotted line shown below (B in Image).

Your grip size is then determined by the measurement between point A and the line of point B.

The 'hand measurement' show below correspond with the detailed grip sizes i.e. if your hand measurement is 4 3/8" (110 to 113 mm) then you should select a Grip Size 3 racket.

Hand Measurement Grip Size
4" (100 - 103mm) 0
4 1/8" (103 - 106mm) 1
4 1/4" (106 - 110mm) 2
4 3/8" (110 - 113mm) 3
4 1/2" (113 - 116mm) 4
4 5/8" (116 - 119mm) 5